IPAD (9TH GENERATION) REVIEW

Changing digital productivity landscape in just over a decade. Apple launched the first iPad in 2010, igniting a new tech arms race alongside the smartphone revolution. In the late aughts, I can’t help but ponder how much stress I could have saved myself if I could have carried an iPad instead of my huge Dell laptop.

You probably already have a favourite tablet or smartphone brand even as you read this review. If you’re anti-Apple, I’m not sure I could sell you on this tablet’s virtues. Also, if you’re an Apple fan who has to refresh your tablet, you know what to anticipate this year.

 

If you’re on the fence, let me assure you that the iPad (9th Gen) is the smoothest tablet I’ve used. In many respects, the potential I saw when I initially got my iPad in 2012 has come true.

IPAD (9TH GENERATION) REVIEW

Hardware

What’s new with the 9th Gen iPad? Its proportions and 10.2” screen are similar to the previous two iterations of this tablet tier. But it differs in some major aspects. This version comes with double the storage, either 64 GB or 256 GB. It has a new A13 chip that Apple claims will enhance power by 20% while reducing power consumption by 40%. Wi-Fi devices start at $429, while cellular variants start at $599. (Canadian dollars, 64 GB or 256 GB respectively).

It has a front-facing camera. The rear camera is a capable workhorse. The iPad (9th Generation) now boasts a 12MP Ultra Wide camera capable of filming in 1080p HD.

If you’re on the fence, let me tell you that the iPad (9th Gen) is the smoothest tablet I’ve used.”

This enables a new FaceTime feature called Center Stage. The fact that my video was shifting around or zooming in when my hands were nowhere from the iPad, confused some relatives, but it is a pleasant addition, especially in these age of common family video conversations, The machine learning kept up with my kids coming and going, but focused on the grownups.

9th Generation iPad Review

But since Center Stage is accessible on Apple’s other new tablet devices, we can compare the iPad’s existing tiers. The iPad (9th Generation) lacks the current iPad Pro’s M1 CPU and 4K-capable cameras, but this increased power comes at a cost roughly double that of the 11″ (256 GB, Wi-Fi) model, and nearly 2.5 times that of the 12.9″ model.

The iPad Mini, which has some of the Pro’s enhancements in an 8.3″ body, is a close second. The 256 GB Wi-Fi iPad Mini costs $220 more than the regular iPad.

IPAD (9TH GENERATION) REVIEW

Apple’s iPad Mini offers some of the Pro’s enhancements in an 8.3-inch package, so it might be the closest competitor.

The iPad (9th Generation) is the greatest alternative for me. It loads games, social media, and media quickly, and a 4K camera upgrade may be overkill for many users. The power is there without breaking the bank, and the size is perfect. I usually use the tiny line, and the size of this gadget seem ideal. Apple has narrowed the gap between this series and its more expensive offspring.

iOS 15 has a lot of features, but most aren’t relevant to a tablet. Beyond Center Stage, the new Focus modes are excellent for blocking out distractions or turning off messages. The camera’s new Cinematic mode will also help novice filmmakers.

“It loads games, social networking, and media quickly, and a 4K camera upgrade may be overkill for many users.”

But there was no software I despised on the iPad (9th Generation). The larger screen helped my usual smartphone apps run seamlessly. I looked for new apps and games to play on this tablet and was pleasantly delighted by Photoshop CS. I’m not an artist, but Photoshop ran smoothly on this iPad while creating social media graphics. Can you draw more than stick figures?

7th Generation iPad Review
From Isidia Final Fantasy: Opera Omnia to Gentian Impact to Apple Arcade’s Clap Hans Golf, I had no issues. In addition to a stylus for touch-screen games, some plainly benefit from a dedicated Bluetooth controller like SteelSeries’ Nimbus+.

The battery retained a decent charge throughout. I was able to go several days without charging it when I used it little, despite Apple’s claims.

Accessories

Apple also gave the Smart Cover and Smart Keyboard for our review, which was disappointing. Both are sleek and simple accessories. They attach magnetically to the iPad’s side and unfold into stands at suitable angles.

IPAD (9TH GENERATION) REVIEW

Everything from Dissidia Final Fantasy: Opera Omnia to Genshin Impact to Apple Arcade’s Clap Hanz Golf worked well.

They don’t cover the device’s back, which seems odd. While I appreciate the use of less material, I would feel safer knowing that the iPad’s entire surface was protected, especially in a household with young children.

Reviewed Ipad (9th Gen)
The Smart Keyboard looks nice but was not designed for me. My hands were cramping from typing for so long that I kept pressing wrong buttons or tapping the screen. Because small keyboards are not “one size fits all,” I wouldn’t rely on this attachment for anything other than Discord/Messenger conversations. If you have smaller hands, I’m sure the Smart Keyboard would be a great help.

Conclusion

Since receiving my first laptop in 2006, I’ve tried several different ways. At university, I used a few different tools to maximize my output, whether it was for taking notes, writing papers, or meeting with partners. They didn’t all click as the iPad did (9th Generation). It immediately improved my family, recreational, expressive, and social lives.

It’s the ultimate iPad compromise—not as big or pricey as the Pro, but larger than the Mini, with all the same key features, power, and performance. Those models will work well if you need a larger or smaller screen, or other functionality. The regular iPad (9th Generation) does almost everything most consumers could expect from this year’s Apple tablets, and it does it well.

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